This blog title  sounds a little pompous, doesn’t it?

Yet, what I’m about to write is tongue-in-cheek, because I’m not qualified to postulate on matters such as these, but I shall proceed with my pontificating.(Fortunately for you, dear reader, I’ve depleted my big-word  memory.

http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111903999904576468224286877908.html

The above Wall Street Journal article explains that the human brain is the only animal brain that shrinks as it ages.

And I think I know why (as I said I’m not qualified, nor have I done research to validate my way of thinking).

Most animals walk on four legs. Even apes and monkeys, our closest animal relatives, walk with their front limbs down at the ground.

Why would this be of any significance to the brain deterioration, you might ask? (or you might not ask depending on your interest in the matter).

I believe that our upright posture makes blood flow to the brain inefficient.

We eat upright and do just about everything upright. The dog hangs his head over a bowl to eat, as does the cat. Their heads are not much higher than their hearts–making it more efficient.

I’m not suggesting we start to walk on all fours, nor eat in a prone position, but I do think that our brains need more of its fuel to keep it from deteriorating.

If you happen to step into the elevator after I’ve ridden on it and see me bending over touching my toes, remember I’m just trying to hydrate my brain—and yes I do have one(an MRI proves it).

Or if you see me bent over in front of the mirror in the office bathroom, you might assume I am getting blood to the brain as opposed to fluffing out my hair.

Knowing this little piece of information could help you in a time of crisis—when you can’t remember someone’s name, for instance.

“Accidentally” drop something and then take your time in picking it up. Hopefully by the time you’ve retrieved the item off the floor, you will have retrieved the name from deep within your brain filing system.

(After reading this, maybe you’ll understand why I write fiction).